pageTracker._initData(); pageTracker._trackPageview(); } catch(err) {}
gold

History

Interesting Facts About Gold Rush

by gold on Oct.22, 2009, under History

interesting-facts-about-gold-rushThere was a man named Erastus Brainerd who helped make Seattle more popular than San Fransico.

There was a place called Dead Horse Gulch, because people thought that horses would help them get up to Dawson. The horses helped carry equipment for a little while but after that they were no good. People would either have to leave them behind or kill them. (continue reading…)

Leave a Comment more...

Gold Discovered in California and Australia

by gold on Oct.20, 2009, under History

gold-australia-californiaIn 1851, during the time that there was a gold rush in California, a gold rush began in Australia. The gold in California was mainly in the form of very fine grains, called gold dust. However, in Australia, it was not unusual for gold nuggets, some very large, to be found. (continue reading…)

Leave a Comment more...

The Use of Gold in Phoenician History - Part II

by gold on Oct.06, 2009, under History

the-use-of-gold-in-phoenician-dentistry-part-iiThe excavations of the 5th and 4th century Phoenician rock tombs, unearthed the second known specimen of Phoenician dental art, were conducted by the American School of Oriental Research of Jerusalem during the early months of 1901.14 The site of the excavations was an open field approximately a mile south-east of the city of Sidon in southern Lebanon, and just east and in full view of the necropolis from which the Gaillardot specimen was taken.

Through the kindness of Dr. Ingholt, the Director of the Museum of Archaeology of the American University of Beirut, it has recently been the writer’s privilege not only to view this astounding bit of dental art15 but to hold it in his own hands and to thoroughly examine it from a dentist’s viewpoint. It is, therefore, an added pleasure to be able to sketch16 and describe this specimen for the readers of the first Archaeological Annual of the University. In view of the great indebtedness the University feels toward the late Dr. and Mrs. Ford, by whose will the appliance came under their care, it shall be a privilege to hereafter refer to it as “The Ford Specimen of Retentive Prosthesis.” (continue reading…)

Leave a Comment more...

The Use of Gold in Phoenician Dentistry Part I

by gold on Oct.06, 2009, under History

the-use-of-gold-in-phoenician-dentistry-part-iJudging from existing archaeological evidence the dentistry of antiquity can be divided into three groups. Group I would seem to consist of the therapeutic or purely medical methods of combatting dental affections. Group II would seem to combine mechanical means of treatment with the earlier and purely medical treatments of Group I.

This mechanical method characteristic of Group II will be called for convenience retentive prosthesis, or that type of dental art which has for its object the retaining of natural dental organs when the ravages of disease would otherwise have caused their loss. Group III is the highest stage of development reached in ancient dentistry: a definite improvement over Groups I and II, since it introduces true dental prosthesis, that is, the art of applying artificial substitutes for lost dental organs. (continue reading…)

Leave a Comment more...

The History of Gold in the Classical Period

by gold on Oct.06, 2009, under History

the-history-of-gold-in-the-classical-period“The metals obtained by, mining, such as silver, gold, and so on, come from water.”
Theophrastus.

Science in the Classical period was confined mostly to speculation. The pre-Aristotelians explained the origin of the universe and natural phenomena in the light of four basic elements - earth, water, air, and fire. This theory probably originated in the ancient Indus Valley civilization, was taken up by the early Babylonian natural scientists, and passed on to the early Greek philosophers, among whom Empedocles (c. 490-430 B.C.) is usually credited with refining the concepts of the theory. Aristotle embraced the four element theory and added another concept, that of the ether. (continue reading…)

Leave a Comment more...

Shortly About Ancient Roman Gold Coins

by gold on Oct.06, 2009, under History

shortly-about-ancient-roman-gold-coinsThe precursors to real Roman coins were made from bronze. Aes rude or rough bronze, aes signatum or signed bronze, and aes grave or heavy bronze were used during the developments of trade and commerce when Romans were looking for a more effective medium of exchange other than barter. Aes grave is considered the first true coins in the history of Roman coinage.

Gold coins in the Roman coinage

The Roman authority often hesitated to strike gold as coins for several reasons. For one, gold was considered a regal metal and was better offered to gods than to be used in daily transactions. (continue reading…)

Leave a Comment more...

Short History of Gold

by gold on Oct.06, 2009, under History

short-history-of-goldA child finds a shiny rock in a creek, thousands of years ago, and the human race is introduced to gold for the first time.

Gold was first discovered as shining, yellow nuggets. “Gold is where you find it,” so the saying goes, and gold was first discovered in its natural state, in streams all over the world. No doubt it was the first metal known to early hominids.

Gold became a part of every human culture. Its brilliance, natural beauty, and luster, and its great malleability and resistance to tarnish made it enjoyable to work and play with. (continue reading…)

Leave a Comment more...

How Did Gold Deposits Appear?

by gold on Oct.06, 2009, under History

how-did-gold-deposits-appearIn early Classical times ancient gold placers and mines were known on many of the Aegean Islands, particularly Siphnos, in mainland Greece, along the southern shores of Pontus Euxinus (Black Sea), and near the western coast of Asia Minor; most were small and soon worked out by the fifth century B.C. Prospecting farther away, particularly in the region of Mt. Tmolus (the modern Boz Dag), revealed the rich electrum placers of the rivers Pactolus and Hermus (the modern Gediz). Legend has it that the Pactolus is the river in which Midas, the mythical founder of the Phrygian kingdom, on the advice of Bacchus bathed in its waters to rid himself of the fatal faculty of turning everything he touched into gold. From the Pactolus came large stores of placer gold won mainly by the Lydian kings, of whom Ardys (c. 650 B.C.) minted at Sardis the earliest gold coins existent. (continue reading…)

Leave a Comment more...

Gold in the Primitive Period

by gold on Oct.06, 2009, under History

gold-in-the-primitive-periodGold was probably the first metal known to the early hominids that, on finding it as nuggets and spangles in the soils and stream sands, were undoubtedly attracted by its intrinsic beauty, great malleability, and virtual indestructibility. As tribal development progressed through the Palaeolithic, Mesolithic, and Neolithic ages, and as people congregated into civilized centres, the metal appears to have taken on a sacred quality because of its enduring character (immortality), being worn initially probably as amulets and later fashioned into religious objects (idols). By the time of the early Indus (Harappa, Mohenjo-Daro, etc.), Sumerian, and Egyptian civilizations (3000-2000 B.C.) gold had not only retained its sacred quality but had become the symbol of wealth and social rank (the royal metal). Homer (c. 1000 B.C.), in the Iliad and Odyssey, the epic poems of ancient Greece, mentions gold repeatedly both as a sign of wealth among mortals and as a symbol of splendour among the immortals. (continue reading…)

Leave a Comment more...

Gold in the Modern Period (from 1800 onwards)

by gold on Oct.06, 2009, under History

gold-in-the-modern-period-from-1800-onwardsThe 19th century began, in some ways quite prophetically, with gold being discovered at Little Meadow Creek, North Carolina in 1803, sparking the first US gold rush. For the next 25 years, North Carolina supplied all the domestic gold coined for currency by the US. Mint in Philadelphia. In 1817, Britain introduced the Sovereign, a small gold coin valued at one pound sterling. Perhaps the century’s pivotal ‘gold moment’ came in 1848, when John Marshall found flakes of gold while building a sawmill for John Sutter near Sacramento, California, triggering the California Gold Rush and hastening the settlement of the American West. But the effects weren’t confined to the United States; in 1850 Edward Hammond Hargraves, returning to Australia from California, predicted he would find gold in his home country within a week. And he did, in New South Wales. 1868 saw the next major discovery, in South Africa, where George Harrison uncovered gold while digging up stones to build a house. Since then, South Africa has been the source of nearly 40% of all gold ever extracted from the earth. (continue reading…)

Leave a Comment more...